Previ Culinary

{Previ Culinary} Asian Asparagus and Edamame Salad

This Asian inspired salad packs a ton of flavor and nutrition, not to mention it is visually stunning. Full of protein, beta carotene, and antioxidants, this great tasting salad will become a week night go-to. Have it as a side dish or as an entree topped with grilled shrimp or fish!

Asian Asparagus and Edamame Salad

Written By: PreviMedica Culinary Advisors

Ingredients:

For the Salad:

  • 1 bunch of asparagus, woody ends trimmed off and sliced very fine into small coins
  • 1 cup frozen green peas, thawed
  • 1 cup edamame, steamed and cooled
  • 2 carrots, peeled and grated
  • 2 Tbsp. sesame seeds

For the Dressing:

  • 2 cloves garlic, grated
  • 1 tsp. fresh ginger, grated
  • 2 Tbsp. organic soy sauce or organic tamari
  • 1 Tbsp. rice vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. sesame oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Combine all of the salad ingredients into a large bowl.
  2. For the dressing, combine all ingredients in a small bowl and whisk well. Pour dressing over salad and season to taste with salt and pepper. Stir in the sesame seeds.
  3. Chill before consuming for at least two hours.

Copy of Healthy Potato Skins

Megan Huard, Chef RD and Stefanie Gates, chef, are regular contributors to our blog and culinary advisors for PreviMedica. They enjoy developing recipes and creating cooking videos to share with our readers, as well as working one-on-one with our clients to teach them valuable cooking skills. You can learn more about them here and here.

Previ Culinary: Roasted Cauliflower & Garlic Soup

Try something different with cauliflower and make soup! This recipe is easy, healthy, and will warm your tummy on even the coldest of days. Not to mention, cauliflower is packed with nutrients to keep those germs at bay during cold and flu season.

 

Roasted Cauliflower and Garlic Soup

(Adapted from: http://www.honestbody.com)

Serves:

Ingredients:

  • 10 – 15 cloves of garlic, unpeeled
  • 1 head of cauliflower
  • 7 Tbsp. ghee
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 2 tsp. dried basil
  • 2 onions, coarsely chopped
  • 4 c. homemade chicken stock

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Divide the cauliflower into florets.
  3. Put the cauliflower pieces and unpeeled garlic into a large bowl.
  4. Melt 3 Tbsp. of ghee in a saucepan and pour over vegetables. Stir to coat.
  5. Pour vegetables into shallow roasting pan and roast for 30 – 40 minutes.
  6. In a large soup pot, melt the remaining butter/coconut oil and sauté’ the onions until soft.
  7. Stir in the dried basil, add the stock and bring to a boil.
  8. Put the roasted vegetables in the pot.
  9. Peel the garlic and add as well.
  10. Blend with immersion blender and cook for another 5 minutes.


Megan Huard, Chef RD and Stefanie Gates, chef, are regular contributors to our blog and culinary advisors for PreviMedica. They enjoy developing recipes and creating cooking videos to share with our readers, as well as working one-on-one with our clients to teach them valuable cooking skills. You can learn more about them here and here.

Coconut Flour Bread

We get a lot of requests for grain-free bread recipes that taste good and are simple to make.  Almond flour and coconut flour are both common and extremely versatile in the kitchen, but sometimes, almonds aren’t an option whether it’s an allergy or an avoidance.  This recipe utilizes coconut flour and coconut oil which are Candida “fighters”, and it includes erythritol, which is a plant based sugar alcohol that is appropriate to consume when following a Candida elimination plan.  You can feel good about having this bread whether you are eating it to stay grain free or eating it to fight Candida!

Coconut Flour Bread

Adapted from: dropthesugar.com

Makes 1 loaf

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup coconut flour
  • 4 eggs plus 2 egg whites
  • ½ cup coconut oil, melted
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • ½ tsp. apple cider vinegar
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1 tbsp. erythritol

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. Mix the coconut flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and erythritol together in a large bowl.
  3. In a separate bowl, mix together coconut oil, apple cider vinegar, and eggs.
  4. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and gently fold until everything is incorporated.
  5. Lightly oil a bread pan and pour batter into bread pan. Bake until a toothpick inserted comes out clean, about 30-40 minutes.

Stefanie Gates, chef, is a regular contributor to our blog and a culinary advisor for PreviMedica. She enjoys developing recipes and creating cooking videos to share with our readers, as well as working one-on-one with our clients to teach them valuable cooking skills. You can learn more about her here.

 

All Things Bell Pepper

Freshly picked selection:

Bell Peppers

Bell peppers are named for their bell like shape and are found in a variety of colors.  The most common color is green but orange, yellow, red, and even purple are becoming more commonly seen.  Their flavor is mildly sweet and their flesh is juicy.  Red bells are actually green bells that have been ripened on the vine longer.

What do I look for?

Look for bell peppers that are firm and not limp or shriveled.  Their skin should be smooth, bright, and their stem should be green with no traces of black.

Ways to Eat:

Bell peppers are one of the most versatile foods and a staple in many different types of cuisines.  They can be chopped up and added to a mirepoix for base flavor like in Creole cooking; they can be stuffed, roasted, sauteed, grilled, baked, steamed…the list goes on.

Recipes:

It’s hard to say no to a Healthy Stuffed Pepper!

Master how to roast peppers three different ways.  Roasting is an incredibly easy way to bring out a peppers inherent sweetness that adds layers of flavor to any dish.

A Pepper and Onion Stir Fry is a great way to enjoy the flavors of the bell pepper with just a quick saute in the wok.

Nutritional Benefits:

References:

Herbst, Sharon Tyler. Food lover’s companion: comprehensive definitions of over 7200 food, wine, and culinary terms. 5th ed. New York: Barron’s Educational Series, 2013. Print.

“Bell Peppers.” Worlds Healthiest Foods, http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?dbid=50&tname=foodspice.

Homemade Almond Cacao Milk

Making your own almond milk is something that seems daunting but in reality it’s one of the easiest things to make at home! All you need is a blender, a nut milk bag, or cheesecloth. We decided to jazz up our traditional almond milk recipe with antioxidant-rich cacao nibs and lightly sweeten it with dates. The end result is a delicious and seemingly decadent drink for any time of day!

Homemade Almond Cacao Milk

Recipe by: Stefanie Gates

Makes 2 cups of milk

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup raw almonds
  • 2 cups filtered water
  • ¼ cup cacao nibs or 2 tbsp. cacao powder
  • 4 pitted dates
  • Pinch of salt

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, cover the almonds with enough water to cover them by at least an inch. Let soak overnight.
  2. Rinse the almonds well in a sieve and pour into blender (Vitamix works well). Add the 2 cups of filtered water, the dates, and the cacao nibs.
  3. Blend on high for about 3 minutes making sure all ingredients are pulverized.
  4. Once pulverized, pour the nut milk into a nut milk bag or into cheesecloth placed in a large bowl. Gently squeeze out liquid into the bowl with clean hands.  Work the pulp until all liquid is squeezed out and set aside.
  5. Pour the nut milk into an airtight container, jar, or milk container and refrigerate for up to three days.

*Note: homemade almond milk does not keep for longer than three days at a time so be sure to only make what you will drink in that time!

**You may also use cacao powder in the place of cacao nibs 


Stefanie Gates, chef, is a regular contributor to our blog and a culinary advisor for PreviMedica. She enjoys developing recipes and creating cooking videos to share with our readers, as well as working one-on-one with our clients to teach them valuable cooking skills. You can learn more about her here.

 

 

All Things Green Beans

Freshly picked selection:

Green Beans

Green beans are known by many different names including string bean, snap bean, and even the french term, “haricot vert”.  The name string bean was given long ago due to the fibrous strands that used to run down the beans.  This feature has been virtually bred out of them but the name is still commonly seen.  Green beans are long, slender, and contain tiny seeds inside.  They are close relatives of the bean (legume) with many of the same health benefits but fewer calories per serving.  Their peak season is May through October.

What do I look for?

Look for green beans that are bright green and firm.  Although some varieties can come in a pale yellow, purple, or even beige color, they should still have the same characteristics.  They should have resistance when bent and make a snapping sound when broken.  Avoid green beans that are discolored, soft, and shriveled.

Ways to Eat:

No matter how they are ultimately cooked, this vegetable is best blanched or steamed a bit first to soften.  Then they can be roasted or simply sauteed with a small amount of butter/oil and garlic.  You can find them canned and frozen in addition to fresh.  Be sure to snap off and discard the woody stem that comes attached to most fresh beans.

Recipes:

Wrapping green beans with turkey bacon and roasting them puts a whole new spin on this vegetable.

This simple side dish of green beans, almonds, and garlic is the perfect accompaniment to any meal.

Try something with an Asian flare with these Sesame Ginger Green Beans.

Nutritional Benefits:

References:

Herbst, Sharon Tyler. Food lover’s companion: comprehensive definitions of over 7200 food, wine, and culinary terms. 5th ed. New York: Barron’s Educational Series, 2013. Print.

“Green Beans.” Worlds Healthiest Foods, http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=134.

Happy National Sugar Cookie Day!

It’s National Sugar Cookie Day! Even though we are all about nutrition here, we still enjoy a sweet treat every now and then. These gluten free sugar cookies may seem “Christmasey” but in our book they are delicious any day of the year!  Soft and sweet, they melt in your mouth making it impossible to tell they are gluten free.  Happy celebrating!

Gluten Free Sugar Cookies

Adapted from: Gluten Free Christmas Cookies, Written by Ellen Brooks

Yields: 2-4 dozen depending on size

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ cups quinoa flour OR 1 cup amaranth flour and ½ cup almond flour
  • 1 cup confectioner’s sugar
  • ½ cup cornstarch
  • 1 tsp. xanthan gum
  • 1 tsp. cream of tartar
  • Pinch of salt
  • ½ lb. unsalted butter, cut into thin slices
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tbsp. whole milk
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • Sweet rice flour for dusting

Directions:

  1. Combine flour, confectioner’s sugar, cornstarch, xanthan gum, cream of tartar, and salt in a food processor fitted with a steel blade and blend for five seconds. Add butter to the work bowl and process, using on and off pulsing until mixture resembles coarse meal.
  2. Combine egg, milk, and vanilla in a small cup and whisk well. Drizzle liquid into the work bowl and pulse about 10 times or until a stiff dough forms.  If dough is dry and doesn’t come together, add additional milk 1 tsp. at a time until dough forms a ball.
  3. Divide dough into half and wrap each half in plastic wrap. Press dough into a pancake and refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm.
  4. Preheat oven to 350°F and line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking sheets.
  5. Lightly dust a sheet of wax paper and a rolling pin with sweet rice flour. Roll dough to a thickness of ¾ inch.  Dip cookie cutters in sweet rice flour and cut out cookies.  Remove excess dough and transfer cookies to the baking sheet.  Re-roll excess dough, chilling it for 15 minutes if necessary.
  6. Bake cookies for 10-12 minutes or until edges are brown. Cook for 2 minutes on the baking sheets and then transfer them with a spatula top cooling racks.
  7. Decorate if desired.


Stefanie Gates, chef, is a regular contributor to our blog and a culinary advisor for PreviMedica. She enjoys developing recipes and creating cooking videos to share with our readers, as well as working one-on-one with our clients to teach them valuable cooking skills. You can learn more about her here.

All Things Scallions

Freshly picked selection:

Scallions

Scallions, otherwise known as, “green onions” or “spring onions” originate from Asia but are now cultivated all over the world.  They are closely related to the onion, and share many of the same health benefits.  The scallion itself is a true scallion if there is no beginning of a bulb that has begun to form at the bottom.  If the bottom looks bulbous, it is considered a green onion.

Where do I look for it?

Scallions or green onions are found fresh in the grocery store produce section.

Ways to Eat:

The delicate flavor of scallions is commonly enjoyed fresh as a last minute addition to your dish and as a garnish.  Roasting scallions will bring out their sweetness much like caramelizing onions will.  When cooking, it is best to use more of the white parts of the scallion as the flavor will hold up to heat better than the green tops.

Ideas for Scallions:

Chop them up and add them to your favorite salad.

Grill stalks of scallions with olive oil, salt and pepper for a unique flavor.

Add chopped scallions to your favorite soup, such as Miso.

Roast scallions in the oven with salt, pepper and olive oil.

Nutritional Benefits:

Our Nutritionists Say:

“Scallions are my favorite onion to have on hand.  They are quick to chop and throw into a dish or a salad and their mild onion flavor isn’t overpowering.  They compliment just about any dish.”

-Stefanie Gates, Culinary Advisor

References:

Herbst, Sharon Tyler. Food lover’s companion: comprehensive definitions of over 7200 food, wine, and culinary terms. 5th ed. New York: Barron’s Educational Series, 2013. Print.

Link, Rachael. “The Immunity-Boosting Powerhouse You May Be Overlooking.” Dr. Axe, Dr. Axe, 9 Oct. 2017, draxe.com/scallions/.

All Things Cauliflower

Freshly picked selection:

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a commonly found cruciferous vegetable.  It is a close family member of cabbage, kale, broccoli and collards.  The head, or “curd” of the cauliflower can come tightly packed or loosely packed.  Americans prefer the tightly packed curd while other cultures, such as the Chinese, prefer loosely packed.  China and India are the two largest consumers of cauliflower in the world.

What to look for when purchasing:

Look for heads of cauliflower that are without discoloraton.  The leaves should also be green without any sign of yellowing. When pressed, the curd should be firm and not give to pressure.

How to store:

Cauliflower should be tightly wrapped and stored in the refrigerator for 3-5 days.  Riced raw cauliflower can be frozen for up to 6 months.  Cooked cauliflower can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

Varieties:

The most popular variety is white cauliflower, but purple and green can also be found.

Nutritional Benefits:

Recipes

Learn how to rice 

OR

mash cauliflower!

This recipe is one of our favorites to date.  See how to make a pizza crust or bread sticks the whole family will LOVE using only cauliflower, eggs, and cheese!

Try making this warming Roasted Garlic and Cauliflower soup.

Our Chefs & Nutritionists Say:

“Cauliflower is truly an underdog that can do almost everything in the kitchen.  From being a rice or potato replacement all the way to making a “bread” with it!  I love it’s versatility.”

-Stefanie Gates, PreviMedica Culinary Advisor

References:

Herbst, Sharon Tyler. Food lover’s companion: comprehensive definitions of over 7200 food, wine, and culinary terms. 5th ed. New York: Barron’s Educational Series, 2013. Print.

“Cauliflower.” Cauliflower, www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=13.

 

Previ Culinary: How to Make Ghee (Clarified Butter)

Ghee, or clarified butter, is a delicious way to still enjoy the flavor of butter without the casein and whey. It is easily found in the grocery store, but did you know that you can make your own at a fraction of the price? Watch the video to find out how!

How to Make Ghee (Clarified Butter)

Written By: Stefanie Gates, Culinary Advisor

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter

Equipment:

  • Saute pan or small sauce pot
  • Spoon or ladle

Directions:

  1. Begin by placing the butter into the pan and turning it on to medium heat.  For faster melting slice the butter.
  2. Once the butter has melted, turn the heat to low.  This is a low and slow process.
  3. Soon, the butter will begin to bubble and you will see separation happening.  The whey will rise to the top and the milk solids will sink to the bottom.  Skim the whey off of the top with a spoon or ladle being careful not to remove the butter.  Let this happen slowly, it will keep separating.
  4. Once you are sure it has all separated and you have skimmed all of the whey off of the top, turn the heat off and let it cool.  Once it’s cool, carefully spoon the clarified butter into a jar being careful not to include the milk solids that have separated into the bottom of the pan.
  5. Refrigerate and use as you would butter or oil!


Stefanie Gates, chef, is a regular contributor to our blog and a culinary advisor for PreviMedica. She enjoys developing recipes and creating cooking videos to share with our readers, as well as working one-on-one with our clients to teach them valuable cooking skills. You can learn more about her here.

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